Domestic Violence

Domestic violence, partner abuse, and battering refer to the physical, emotional, sexual, and psychological abuse, performed by one person against another. The abuser and the victim are often involved in or have had an intimate or romantic relationship.

Domestic violence, including battering, happens in all socioeconomic levels, to urban or rural women, young or old, single, married, with children or without, divorced - and within all religious, racial, ethnic groups, and geographic locations. Councils on Family Violence have designated domestic violence battering as an “Unreported Epidemic.” It is important to note, that women initiate and carry out physical assaults on their partners as often as men do, according to a 1993 study by Straus and Gelles. However, when it comes to serious physical abuse, women are still overwhelmingly on the receiving end.

More women are injured through domestic violence than by rape, muggings, and car accidents combined. Many pregnant women have been and may be victims of domestic violence abuse. Forced sex or marital rape is the leading type of sexual assault. Yet marital rape or forced sex may be the most underreported and least legally punished crime of partner abuse because many victims are reluctant to report and file charges against the abuser, for various reasons.

     

Domestic Violence is not a private matter, a couple’s problem, a domestic "squabble" or a "fight." It is not a momentary loss of temper or the abuse of alcohol and drugs. Violence is a choice the abuser makes.

Domestic Violence is a deliberate pattern of abusive tactics used by one partner in an intimate relationship to obtain and maintain power and control over the other person.

Domestic violence is not an isolated instance of aggression. It is an atmosphere that is created by many forms of abuse and a cycle that increases over time in frequency and intensity.

WHEN YOU ARE A VICTIM OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Call 911 immediately. This will activate the criminal justice system in regards to your domestic violence abuse and injurious claims

Try to give police all available information and make certain that the police listen and write down your statements, and direct quotes of what your abuser said while attacking you.

Never refuse medical evaluations and medical services! Never clean up the house or location after a domestic violence attack, so that critical evidence of harm or injury is not removed. Keep a camera on hand to photograph your injuries and any damage to property, etc. Remember, “A picture is worth a thousand words,” and is good for evidence.